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Hatley Park Collection
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Hatley Castle

Hatley Castle was designed by Samuel Maclure and built by contractor Thomas Catterall between 1908 and 1910. The castle was owned by the Dunsmuir family from 1908 until 1940 when it was purchased by the Canadian government for use as a Naval training establishment.

Hatley castle from North West

Hatley castle from North West. Road is not yet paved. Steps lead down to where Italian garden will be. Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910. The Italian garden to the west of the castle was added as part of extensive development of the Hatley Park estate by Boston based landscape architects, Brett and Hall from 1912-1914.

Hatley Castle from South East, possibly soon after completion

Hatley Castle from South East, possibly soon after completion. Window awnings on windows, bay trees on terrace, no ivy growth. Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910.

Japanese Gardens

The upper Japanese garden at Hatley Park was designed by Japanese landscape architect Isaburo Kishida. The garden was installed in 1909 and developed by Tadashi Noda from 1913-1927.

Hatley castle from south east at a distance, showing fence on lawns and a bench under the cedar tree.

Hatley castle from south east at a distance, showing fence on lawns and a bench under the cedar tree. Note the apparent rocky outcrop to the right of the castle.
Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910.

Newly completed Hatley Castle from site of future croquet lawn

Newly completed Hatley Castle from site of future croquet lawn (before Italian and croquet are installed). Note screens on west end of terrace. Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910.

Hatley Castle from the north, soon after completion

Hatley Castle from the north, soon after completion. Note lack of Neptune steps, and non-paved circular driveway. Landscaping is rudimentary.
Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910. The Neptune Steps and Fountain Court to the north of the castle were added as part of extensive development of the Hatley Park estate by Boston based landscape architects, Brett and Hall from 1912-1914.

Hatley Castle from East driveway

Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910.

Early Japanese garden pond from south west

Pond has no stone lining and floating pavilion is not yet constructed although there is a gazebo structure on what appears to be an island in the pond. Castle is visible in the background. The upper Japanese garden at Hatley Park was designed by Japanese landscape architect Isaburo Kishida. The garden was installed in 1909 and developed by Tadashi Noda from 1913-1927.

Buildings at Hatley Park

When James Dunsmuir purchased the Hatley Park land in 1907, he acquired some surrounding property to expand the estate and hired Samuel Maclure to design the large family home, now known as Hatley Castle. In 1911, unsatisfied with the estate layout, Dunsmuir hired Brett and Hall, a Boston-based landscaping company, to develop the estate and model farm.

Rustic garden bench in Japanese garden. Rose garden is visible in the background

The upper Japanese garden at Hatley Park was designed by Japanese landscape architect Isaburo Kishida. The garden was installed in 1909 and developed by Tadashi Noda from 1913-1927. This bench was located in the upper Japanese garden. Rose swags (ropes for trailing roses) are visible in the background, framing the rose garden area.

Original stables courtyard with 5 horses on display. The building was later converted to apartments

When Samuel Maclure constructed Hatley Park, 1908-1910, several other buildings were also constructed as part of the estate, including a stables and separate garage at the top of the hill near Sooke Road. After the Dunsmuirs moved in, they decided some elements of the estate design were not satisfactory and hired Boston based landscape architects, Brett and Hall to make improvements. One of the improvements they made was to move the stables and garages closer to the main house and farming area. Laura Dunsmuir later converted the former stables into apartments for staff and/or family and visitors.

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