Showing 148 results

archival descriptions
Hatley Park Collection
Advanced search options
Print preview View:

125 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

James Dunsmuir Jr on Kismet outside Hatley Castle. Kismet is standing still

James Dunsmuir Jr, known to his family as ‘Boy’, and to others as Jim, was born in 1894. His childhood education took place at Loretto, a private school in Scotland, where he became an accomplished lightweight boxer. After he completed his schooling, Jim went to Montreal and worked as a private secretary at a bank. With a lifelong love of horses, it came as no surprise that he enlisted in the B.C. Horse and later the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles (CMR) stationed at Willows fairground in Victoria at the outbreak of the First World War. Having taken the cavalry school course in Winnipeg, Jim was made a lieutenant, but he quickly grew frustrated with the seemingly endless ceremonial duties of the CMR. Anxious to contribute to the war in Europe, Jim resigned his commission and set sail for England to join a British cavalry regiment. Jim departed from New York on May 1, 1915, on the luxury passenger ship Lusitania. Tragically, as the ship neared the Irish coast on May 7, it was hit by a German torpedo and sank. His body was never recovered.
This image, with Jim sat on his horse, Kismet, was taken when he was stationed in Victoria. There are similar versions of this photograph in this and other collections.

Stables courtyard with 5 horses on display

James Dunsmuir Jr is just out of shot on left side, holding Kismet's reins. Mann family members hold the other horses. Coachman, Fred Mann is with 4th horse from left.

Coachman, William Edward John (‘Fred’) Mann, was in charge of the stables at Hatley Park. Also employed were his sons, Charlie, Bill and Jack. His youngest son, Harry, also helped out in the stables when not attending school. They are standing in the courtyard of the U-shaped stables and garage building. The coachman's home was attached to the stables at the east side of the building and the chauffeur’s home was attached to the garages on the west side. The building was added as part of the extensive estate development by Brett and Hall, 1912-1914.

Stables courtyard with 8 horses on display

Harry Mann holds Dola's horse, Beauty on left, James Dunsmuir Jr. holds two horses and Mann family members hold the remaining 5 horses. Horses are not ready for the photo.
Coachman, William Edward John (‘Fred’) Mann, was in charge of the stables at Hatley Park. Also employed were his sons, Charlie, Bill and Jack. His youngest son, Harry, also helped out in the stables when not attending school. They are standing in the courtyard of the U-shaped stables and garage building. The coachman's home was attached to the stables at the east side of the building and the chauffeur’s home was attached to the garages on the west side. The building was added as part of the extensive estate development by Brett and Hall, 1912-1914.

Original stables courtyard with 5 horses on display. The building was later converted to apartments

When Samuel Maclure constructed Hatley Park, 1908-1910, several other buildings were also constructed as part of the estate, including a stables and separate garage at the top of the hill near Sooke Road. After the Dunsmuirs moved in, they decided some elements of the estate design were not satisfactory and hired Boston based landscape architects, Brett and Hall to make improvements. One of the improvements they made was to move the stables and garages closer to the main house and farming area. Laura Dunsmuir later converted the former stables into apartments for staff and/or family and visitors.

Ground being prepared for Italian garden and croquet lawn. View from lower pond looking northeast

Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910. The construction was overseen by contractor, Thomas Catterall.
The Italian garden to the west of the castle was added as part of extensive development of the Hatley Park estate by Boston based landscape architects, Brett and Hall from 1912-1914.

Rustic garden bench in Japanese garden. Rose garden is visible in the background

The upper Japanese garden at Hatley Park was designed by Japanese landscape architect Isaburo Kishida. The garden was installed in 1909 and developed by Tadashi Noda from 1913-1927. This bench was located in the upper Japanese garden. Rose swags (ropes for trailing roses) are visible in the background, framing the rose garden area.

Newly completed conservatory north side. Looking south east

The greenhouse and conservatory were constructed and installed by the Lord and Burnham Company and they later used the estate installation in their promotional material. The glass house complex had a full time manager and required 60 tons of coal and 200 cords of wood per year to heat. The ornate conservatory pictured had a central dome of about 30 ft square, with two side galleries, each 60 ft long. Flowers were grown inside that were intended for display in the castle and in later years it was also used for food production. According to a former gardener, interviewed in the 1950s, Laura Dunsmuir said that the conservatory was an extravagance in a private garden and that it should be in a public park.

Hatley Castle under construction

Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910. The construction was overseen by contractor, Thomas Catterall.

view of newly completed mews courtyard, west side

The U-shaped stables and garage building was built as part of the estate development by Boston based landscape architects Brett and Hall between 1912 and 1914. The coachman's home was attached to the stables at the east side of the building and the chauffeur’s home was attached to the garages on the west side. Above the garages were single person's accommodation. This image is looking into the south west corner of the courtyard. The carriage house formed the central, south side of the building.

Hatley Park Estate

The Hatley Park estate was so named in 1889 when the land was purchased by Roland Stuart and Charles St. Aubyn Pearse. The name derives from the ancestral home of the Pearse family in England. When James Dunsmuir purchased the land in 1907, he acquired some surrounding property to expand the estate and hired Samuel Maclure to design the large family home, now known as Hatley Castle. In 1911, unsatisfied with the estate layout, Dunsmuir hired Brett and Hall, a Boston-based landscaping company, to develop the estate and model farm.

While the castle was under construction from 1908-1910, Dunsmuir also hired a Japanese gardener, Isaburo Kishida, to install a Japanese garden to the west of the family home. The garden was maintained and expanded by another Japanese gardener, Tadashi Noda, between 1913 and 1927.

In 1937, when Laura Dunsmuir died, the estate was managed by trustees until it was sold to the Canadian government in 1940. Various attempts were made to sell the property, including a promotional film by Douglas Flintoff.

Images show the Japanese gardens at various points in time, as well as some of the other buildings on the estate besides the castle. Also in this series are some pictures of Roland Stuart’s Hatley Park Estate.

Japanese Gardens

The upper Japanese garden at Hatley Park was designed by Japanese landscape architect Isaburo Kishida. The garden was installed in 1909 and developed by Tadashi Noda from 1913-1927.

Early Japanese garden pond from south west

Pond has no stone lining and floating pavilion is not yet constructed although there is a gazebo structure on what appears to be an island in the pond. Castle is visible in the background. The upper Japanese garden at Hatley Park was designed by Japanese landscape architect Isaburo Kishida. The garden was installed in 1909 and developed by Tadashi Noda from 1913-1927.

Early Japanese garden pond from South west

New pavilion is installed, as is floating bridge. The upper Japanese garden at Hatley Park was designed by Japanese landscape architect Isaburo Kishida. The garden was installed in 1909 and developed by Tadashi Noda from 1913-1927.

Results 101 to 125 of 148