Print preview Close

Showing 112 results

archival descriptions
File
Advanced search options
Print preview View:

Roland Stuart's Hatley Park

The Hatley Park estate was so named in 1889 when the land was purchased by Roland Stuart and Charles St. Aubyn Pearse. The name derives from the ancestral home of the Pearse family in England. Pearse died in 1901 and Stuart had a number of other business partners and tenant farmers who helped manage the estate.

A large fire destroyed the property in 1905 and shortly after, Roland Stuart put the estate up for sale.

Brown Suede Album

  • CA RRU 025-002-1-6
  • File
  • ca. 1890-1910
  • Part of K. McCann

Images in this album are predominantly from before the Dunsmuir family lived at Hatley Park. There are several images of the Dunsmuir children living at Burleith, their home on Victoria's Gorge waterway from 1892 until 1906 when James Dunsmuir became the province's Lieutenant-Governor and the family moved to Government House. There are also pictures taken in the UK soon after Maye was married to Lt. Arthur Bromley in 1904. Also included are images from an apparent tourist trip to visit goldrush settlements such as Bennett, Dawson City and Whitehorse. Along with these are souvenir photos of Atlin, BC, by noted photographer A.C. Hirshfeld. James Dunsmuir travelled to Atlin in 1901 as part of the provincial government's 'Atlin Committee' investigating mining licenses issued to aliens, among other things.

Black Album 2

  • CA RRU 025-002-1-2
  • File
  • ca. 1908-1940
  • Part of K. McCann

Black Album 2 contains pictures of various Dunsmuir vacations, including a trip to Egypt in 1912. Most of the people and places in this album are unidentified.

Black Album 4

  • CA RRU 025-002-1-4
  • File
  • ca. 1908-1940
  • Part of K. McCann

Photos in this album were collected by Muriel Dunsmuir and include several images from her home, Journey's End, which was built adjacent to the Hatley Park estate and is now a part of Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site. There are also many views of Hatley Park taken ca. 1939-1940, when there were no longer any Dunsmuir family members in residence, but the estate had not yet been sold to the Canadian Government for use as a naval training establishment.

Japanese Gardens

The upper Japanese garden at Hatley Park was designed by Japanese landscape architect Isaburo Kishida. The garden was installed in 1909 and developed by Tadashi Noda from 1913-1927.

Black Album 1

  • CA RRU 025-002-1-1
  • File
  • ca. 1908-1940
  • Part of K. McCann

Black Album 1 mainly contains images around Hatley Park

Buildings at Hatley Park

When James Dunsmuir purchased the Hatley Park land in 1907, he acquired some surrounding property to expand the estate and hired Samuel Maclure to design the large family home, now known as Hatley Castle. In 1911, unsatisfied with the estate layout, Dunsmuir hired Brett and Hall, a Boston-based landscaping company, to develop the estate and model farm.

Shields, WE

Walter Edward Shields attended Royal Roads January to April in 1941, in the first class of RCNVR Special Entry cadets. The first five classes were also known informally as ‘90 Day wonders’, as their wartime training at HMCS Royal Roads was just over 3 months. Born 21 April, 1917, Shields was training to become a lawyer before joining the RCNVR. On completion of training, he joined HMCS Windflower, which was sunk on 7 December, 1941. Shields was one of 23 men who lost their lives in the incident.

Russel, HDS

Hugh Dunbar Sutherland Russel attended Royal Roads January to April in 1941, in the first class of RCNVR Special Entry cadets. The first five classes were also known informally as ‘90 Day wonders’, as their wartime training at HMCS Royal Roads was just over 3 months. Born 11 March, 1916, Russel was a surveyor before joining the RCNVR. After completing training in Canada, he was loaned to the Royal Navy. He is presumed to have lost his life on 12 December, 1942 when the submarine in which he was serving in the Mediterranean was posted missing, overdue.

Walkley, JM

John Molson Walkley attended Royal Roads January to April in 1941, in the first class of RCNVR Special Entry cadets. The first five classes were also known informally as ‘90 Day wonders’, as their wartime training at HMCS Royal Roads was just over 3 months. Born 25 July, 1915, Walkley worked for an insurance company before joining the RCNVR. On completing training, he joined HMCS Nanaimo, which was sunk by a U-boat on 16 June 1942. Lt. Walkley was awarded a posthumous Mention in Despatches for his salvage efforts during the capsizing.

McConnell, RH

Russell Henry McConnell attended Royal Roads May to August in 1941, in the second class of RCNVR Special Entry cadets. The first five classes were also known informally as ‘90 Day wonders’, as their wartime training at HMCS Royal Roads was just over 3 months. Born 7 June, 1918, McConnell was an accountant before joining the RCNVR. He was serving in HMCS Raccoon when it was sunk on 7 September, 1942.

Results 1 to 25 of 112