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Hatley Park Collection
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view of newly completed mews courtyard, west side

The U-shaped stables and garage building was built as part of the estate development by Boston based landscape architects Brett and Hall between 1912 and 1914. The coachman's home was attached to the stables at the east side of the building and the chauffeur’s home was attached to the garages on the west side. Above the garages were single person's accommodation. This image is looking into the south west corner of the courtyard. The carriage house formed the central, south side of the building.

unpaved road at Hatley Park

Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. The estate was further developed from 1912-1914 by Boston based landscape architects, Brett and Hall. This included addition of a new entrance on Sooke Road that would bring the visitor down a winding, serpentine road to the main house. An extensive network of roads and trails were added to the estate.

Stables courtyard with 8 horses on display

Harry Mann holds Dola's horse, Beauty on left, James Dunsmuir Jr. holds two horses and Mann family members hold the remaining 5 horses.
Coachman, William Edward John (‘Fred’) Mann, was in charge of the stables at Hatley Park. Also employed were his sons, Charlie, Bill and Jack. His youngest son, Harry, also helped out in the stables when not attending school. They are standing in the courtyard of the U-shaped stables and garage building. The coachman's home was attached to the stables at the east side of the building and the chauffeur’s home was attached to the garages on the west side. The building was added as part of the extensive estate development by Brett and Hall, 1912-1914.

Stables courtyard with 8 horses on display

Harry Mann holds Dola's horse, Beauty on left, James Dunsmuir Jr. holds two horses and Mann family members hold the remaining 5 horses. Horses are not ready for the photo.
Coachman, William Edward John (‘Fred’) Mann, was in charge of the stables at Hatley Park. Also employed were his sons, Charlie, Bill and Jack. His youngest son, Harry, also helped out in the stables when not attending school. They are standing in the courtyard of the U-shaped stables and garage building. The coachman's home was attached to the stables at the east side of the building and the chauffeur’s home was attached to the garages on the west side. The building was added as part of the extensive estate development by Brett and Hall, 1912-1914.

Stables courtyard with 5 horses on display

James Dunsmuir Jr is just out of shot on left side, holding Kismet's reins. Mann family members hold the other horses. Coachman, Fred Mann is with 4th horse from left.

Coachman, William Edward John (‘Fred’) Mann, was in charge of the stables at Hatley Park. Also employed were his sons, Charlie, Bill and Jack. His youngest son, Harry, also helped out in the stables when not attending school. They are standing in the courtyard of the U-shaped stables and garage building. The coachman's home was attached to the stables at the east side of the building and the chauffeur’s home was attached to the garages on the west side. The building was added as part of the extensive estate development by Brett and Hall, 1912-1914.

Rustic garden bench in Japanese garden. Rose garden is visible in the background

The upper Japanese garden at Hatley Park was designed by Japanese landscape architect Isaburo Kishida. The garden was installed in 1909 and developed by Tadashi Noda from 1913-1927. This bench was located in the upper Japanese garden. Rose swags (ropes for trailing roses) are visible in the background, framing the rose garden area.

Roland Stuart's Hatley Park home from the pond

Image shows the farmhouse at Roland Stuart's Hatley Park estate. In the foreground, the pond that would later form part of the Dunsmuirs' formal gardens is visible. Farm labourers are gathering hay.
In the summer of 1903, architect Ridgeway-Wilson was engaged to make some alterations to the home, including the use of a half timber and plaster finish. It is possible that this image post dates the improvements made.

Roland Stuart's Hatley Park

The Hatley Park estate was so named in 1889 when the land was purchased by Roland Stuart and Charles St. Aubyn Pearse. The name derives from the ancestral home of the Pearse family in England. Pearse died in 1901 and Stuart had a number of other business partners and tenant farmers who helped manage the estate.

A large fire destroyed the property in 1905 and shortly after, Roland Stuart put the estate up for sale.

Real Estate film

1- 16 mm colour film with inter-titles of Hatley Park property [1937 - 1940]. Promotional film commissioned by the Royal Trust Company. Film by Douglas Flintoff.

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