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Hatley Park Collection
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Hatley Castle from just west of the croquet lawn

Hatley Castle in the snow from just west of the croquet lawn. Canadian Naval Ensign is flying from flagmast, suggests this is post 1940.
Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910. It was sold in 1940 to the Canadian Government and became HMCS Royal Roads, a naval training establishment.

Hatley Castle from North East

Hatley Castle from North East. Italian garden and Neptune Steps are completed. Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910. The Italian garden to the west of the castle and the Neptune Steps to the north were added as part of extensive development of the Hatley Park estate by Boston based landscape architects, Brett and Hall from 1912-1914.

Hatley Castle from North from Neptune Steps

Hatley Castle from North from Neptune Steps. Photo is torn at top and bottom left. Planting along steps is mature.
Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910.

Hatley castle from North West

Hatley castle from North West. Road is not yet paved. Steps lead down to where Italian garden will be. Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910. The Italian garden to the west of the castle was added as part of extensive development of the Hatley Park estate by Boston based landscape architects, Brett and Hall from 1912-1914.

Hatley Castle from north west, looking south east

Hatley Castle from north west, looking south east. Italian garden is visible on right and road is newly paved.
Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910. The Italian garden to the west of the castle was added as part of extensive development of the Hatley Park estate by Boston based landscape architects, Brett and Hall from 1912-1914.

Hatley Castle from north west, through the woods

Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910. The estate was further developed from 1912-1914 by Boston based landscape architects, Brett and Hall. This included addition of a new entrance on Sooke Road that would bring the visitor down a winding, serpentine road to the main house. This view through the trees was the first glimpse the visitor had of the Dunsmuir's castle.

Hatley castle from south east at a distance, showing fence on lawns and a bench under the cedar tree.

Hatley castle from south east at a distance, showing fence on lawns and a bench under the cedar tree. Note the apparent rocky outcrop to the right of the castle.
Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910.

Hatley Castle from south east under construction. Two men in foreground.

Hatley Castle from south east under construction. Two men in foreground. Windows not yet installed.
Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910. The construction was overseen by contractor, Thomas Catterall.

Hatley castle from south east with construction crew in front.

Hatley castle from south east with construction crew in front. Most windows have been installed, some scaffolding remains around terrace wall.
Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910. The construction was overseen by contractor, Thomas Catterall.

Hatley castle from south east, on terrace lawn

Hatley castle from south east, on terrace lawn. Significant ivy growth on castle.
Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910.

Hatley Castle from South East, possibly soon after completion

Hatley Castle from South East, possibly soon after completion. Window awnings on windows, bay trees on terrace, no ivy growth. Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910.

Hatley castle from South west, from Japanese Garden, pavilion is possibly newly completed

Hatley castle from South west, from Japanese Garden, pavilion is possibly newly completed. Plantings on the island are young.
Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910. The upper Japanese garden at Hatley Park was designed by Japanese landscape architect Isaburo Kishida. The garden was installed in 1909 and developed by Tadashi Noda from 1913-1927.

Hatley castle from South west, from the croquet lawn

Hatley castle from South west, from the croquet lawn. Some ivy cover on castle and there is a white naval ensign flying at the flagmast, suggesting this image is from military era. Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910. It was sold to the Canadian government in 1940 and became HMCS Royal Roads, a naval training establishment.

Hatley castle from South west, from the croquet lawn

Hatley castle from South west, from the croquet lawn. The castle is covered in ivy and there is a white naval ensign flying at the flagmast, suggesting this image is from military era.
Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910. It was purchased by the Canadian government in 1940 and renamed HMCS, Royal Roads, a naval training establishment.

Hatley castle from the croquet lawn

Hatley castle from the croquet lawn, significant ivy growth on the castle. Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910.

Hatley Castle from the north, soon after completion

Hatley Castle from the north, soon after completion. Note lack of Neptune steps, and non-paved circular driveway. Landscaping is rudimentary.
Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910. The Neptune Steps and Fountain Court to the north of the castle were added as part of extensive development of the Hatley Park estate by Boston based landscape architects, Brett and Hall from 1912-1914.

Hatley Castle from the south

Hatley Castle from the south. Terrace lawn, people in uniform walking on terrace, indicates this is Naval college era. Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910. It was sold in 1940 to the Canadian Government and became HMCS Royal Roads, a naval training establishment.

Hatley Castle from the south west, Japanese garden floating bridge is visible

Hatley Castle from the south west, Japanese garden floating bridge is visible, likely newly installed.
Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910.

Hatley Castle under construction

Hatley Castle was designed by renowned British Columbia architect Samuel Maclure for James Dunsmuir. Using only the finest materials, builders, stonemasons and detail carpenters only took 18 months to construct the building from 1908 until 1910. The construction was overseen by contractor, Thomas Catterall.

Hatley Park Collection

  • CA RRU 025-001
  • Collection
  • 1890-1990

There are several images of the castle, gardens and grounds at various points in time, as well as of Dunsmuir family members, and those of staff or contractors who worked on the Hatley Park estate. Some images are not from Hatley Park but have been included in collection because of their obvious connections, such as images of the Wellington mines.

Hatley Park Estate

The Hatley Park estate was so named in 1889 when the land was purchased by Roland Stuart and Charles St. Aubyn Pearse. The name derives from the ancestral home of the Pearse family in England. When James Dunsmuir purchased the land in 1907, he acquired some surrounding property to expand the estate and hired Samuel Maclure to design the large family home, now known as Hatley Castle. In 1911, unsatisfied with the estate layout, Dunsmuir hired Brett and Hall, a Boston-based landscaping company, to develop the estate and model farm.

While the castle was under construction from 1908-1910, Dunsmuir also hired a Japanese gardener, Isaburo Kishida, to install a Japanese garden to the west of the family home. The garden was maintained and expanded by another Japanese gardener, Tadashi Noda, between 1913 and 1927.

In 1937, when Laura Dunsmuir died, the estate was managed by trustees until it was sold to the Canadian government in 1940. Various attempts were made to sell the property, including a promotional film by Douglas Flintoff.

Images show the Japanese gardens at various points in time, as well as some of the other buildings on the estate besides the castle. Also in this series are some pictures of Roland Stuart’s Hatley Park Estate.

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