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Hatley Park Estate

The Hatley Park estate was so named in 1889 when the land was purchased by Roland Stuart and Charles St. Aubyn Pearse. The name derives from the ancestral home of the Pearse family in England. When James Dunsmuir purchased the land in 1907, he acquired some surrounding property to expand the estate and hired Samuel Maclure to design the large family home, now known as Hatley Castle. In 1911, unsatisfied with the estate layout, Dunsmuir hired Brett and Hall, a Boston-based landscaping company, to develop the estate and model farm.

While the castle was under construction from 1908-1910, Dunsmuir also hired a Japanese gardener, Isaburo Kishida, to install a Japanese garden to the west of the family home. The garden was maintained and expanded by another Japanese gardener, Tadashi Noda, between 1913 and 1927.

In 1937, when Laura Dunsmuir died, the estate was managed by trustees until it was sold to the Canadian government in 1940. Various attempts were made to sell the property, including a promotional film by Douglas Flintoff.

Images show the Japanese gardens at various points in time, as well as some of the other buildings on the estate besides the castle. Also in this series are some pictures of Roland Stuart’s Hatley Park Estate.

Japanese Gardens

The upper Japanese garden at Hatley Park was designed by Japanese landscape architect Isaburo Kishida. The garden was installed in 1909 and developed by Tadashi Noda from 1913-1927.

Early Japanese garden pond from south west

Pond has no stone lining and floating pavilion is not yet constructed although there is a gazebo structure on what appears to be an island in the pond. Castle is visible in the background. The upper Japanese garden at Hatley Park was designed by Japanese landscape architect Isaburo Kishida. The garden was installed in 1909 and developed by Tadashi Noda from 1913-1927.

Early Japanese garden pond from south west

Newly installed two humped bridge to island and young landscaping on the island. Castle is visible in the background. The upper Japanese garden at Hatley Park was designed by Japanese landscape architect Isaburo Kishida. The garden was installed in 1909 and developed by Tadashi Noda from 1913-1927.

Early Japanese garden pond from South west

New pavilion is installed, as is floating bridge. The upper Japanese garden at Hatley Park was designed by Japanese landscape architect Isaburo Kishida. The garden was installed in 1909 and developed by Tadashi Noda from 1913-1927.

Early Japanese garden pond from South west

New pavilion is installed, as is floating bridge. South shore of pond is just visible in foreground. The upper Japanese garden at Hatley Park was designed by Japanese landscape architect Isaburo Kishida. The garden was installed in 1909 and developed by Tadashi Noda from 1913-1927.

Buildings at Hatley Park

When James Dunsmuir purchased the Hatley Park land in 1907, he acquired some surrounding property to expand the estate and hired Samuel Maclure to design the large family home, now known as Hatley Castle. In 1911, unsatisfied with the estate layout, Dunsmuir hired Brett and Hall, a Boston-based landscaping company, to develop the estate and model farm.

Conservatory complex from the west. Man stood in front of conservatory

The greenhouse and conservatory were constructed and installed by the Lord and Burnham Company and they later used the estate installation in their promotional material. The glass house complex had a full time manager and required 60 tons of coal and 200 cords of wood per year to heat. The ornate conservatory pictured had a central dome of about 30 ft square, with two side galleries, each 60 ft long. Flowers were grown inside that were intended for display in the castle and in later years it was also used for food production. According to a former gardener, interviewed in the 1950s, Laura Dunsmuir said that the conservatory was an extravagance in a private garden and that it should be in a public park.

panoramic photo of Hatley Park from garden ponds. Italian garden is under construction

The Italian garden is under construction and early Japanese garden (pre stone lined pond) is visible.
The Italian garden to the west of the castle was added as part of extensive development of the Hatley Park estate by Boston based landscape architects, Brett and Hall from 1912-1914.
The upper Japanese garden at Hatley Park was designed by Japanese landscape architect Isaburo Kishida. The garden was installed in 1909 and developed by Tadashi Noda from 1913-1927.

Roland Stuart's Hatley Park

The Hatley Park estate was so named in 1889 when the land was purchased by Roland Stuart and Charles St. Aubyn Pearse. The name derives from the ancestral home of the Pearse family in England. Pearse died in 1901 and Stuart had a number of other business partners and tenant farmers who helped manage the estate.

A large fire destroyed the property in 1905 and shortly after, Roland Stuart put the estate up for sale.

Roland Stuart's Hatley Park home from the pond

Image shows the farmhouse at Roland Stuart's Hatley Park estate. In the foreground, the pond that would later form part of the Dunsmuirs' formal gardens is visible. Farm labourers are gathering hay.
In the summer of 1903, architect Ridgeway-Wilson was engaged to make some alterations to the home, including the use of a half timber and plaster finish. It is possible that this image post dates the improvements made.

Real Estate film

1- 16 mm colour film with inter-titles of Hatley Park property [1937 - 1940]. Promotional film commissioned by the Royal Trust Company. Film by Douglas Flintoff.

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